Can Virtual Care Reverse Clerical Burden Induced Physician Burnout?

July 26, 2016

The healthcare industry is faced with a crisis: physician burnout. An article in the September/October edition of Family Practice Management labeled physician burnout an “epidemic.” And this epidemic is costing health systems in a major way.


Physicians experiencing burnout are less engaged, leading to higher levels of turnover and an increased likelihood of medical errors – both of which can dramatically affect a health system’s bottom line. Moreover, burnout may lead to increased substance abuse, depression and suicide among medical professionals.


While there is no one single cause of burnout, recent research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings indicates a correlation between use of EHR/EMR systems and physician burnout. Mirroring findings from a report issued in 2013, this new research indicates that things have not improved over the past several years.


The link between EHR/EMR systems and physician burnout is the amount of time spent on administrative or clerical tasks, such as data entry. The more time physicians are required to spend entering data into their EMR, the lower their job satisfaction and the higher their likelihood of burnout.


Traditional Telemedicine Falls Short


Traditional telemedicine, where physicians interact with patients via telephone or video chat, doesn’t lessen the burden of data entry. Physicians must still spend significant time on documenting the encounter. This type of telemedicine service requires a physician be waiting at a computer terminal for a patient to request a virtual visit. Consequently, physicians supporting telemedicine may be tasked with additional clerical or administrative work to fill the time between patient calls.


Far from lessening administrative burden, this may actually put greater strain on clinicians who support a direct-to-video telemedicine service.


Technology May Still be the Answer


While traditional telemedicine doesn’t offer a solution to physicians’ ever-growing list of administrative tasks, technology applications can still offer some respite. QuantidaMD, a community and educational resource for physicians, suggests that mobile health and virtual care might offer a solution to combat burnout. They indicate that technology can empower patients to take control of their health, as well as offering physicians simple means of capturing patient data.


Mobile health (mHealth) and virtual care have the potential to significantly decrease the amount of data entry required of physicians. In a recent whitepaper on mobile technology, Athena Health noted that mobile devices and apps can help optimize clinical workflows and patient care through clinical decision support, enhancing clinical efficiency, and providing tools for engaging patients and supporting population health.


So, How Does that Work in Practice?


At Zipnosis, we view virtual care technology as a means to meet patient needs while making life easier for physicians. We leverage an online adaptive interview, which asks the same questions a clinician would and records patient responses. Clinicians then receive a comprehensive clinical note, along with clinical decision support in the form of curated diagnosis and treatment options. Physicians can diagnose and prescribe treatment for common conditions with just a few taps on their smartphone or tablet.


The best part? All data from the virtual visit is securely transmitted to the health system for inclusion in the EMR, eliminating the need for physicians to spend their time entering information into an EMR. And, we offer health systems deeper integration options, which can further simplify the process and enhance physician experience.


People don’t seek out a career in medicine because they want to spend hours each day on data entry. Rather, they want to solve problems and help patients. At Zipnosis, our goal is to offer innovative access to mainstream medicine, while easing the burden on providers. We’re gratified to find that our obsessive focus on ease of use has created a platform that can help address this growing cause of physician burnout.


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